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The Innocents (1961)

20 Oct

 

One of the creepiest scenes in this film has relatively little to do with the plot. It's just another in a long string of relentlessly odd shots that serve to completely unnerve the viewer.

Both visually stunning and relentlessly creepy, “The Innocents” proves a film needn’t be gory to be scary. This is a movie of which one can honestly say, “They don’t make ’em like that anymore,” and know it’s too bad they don’t. Modern horror movies could not help but benefit from the type of intensely focused plot and filmmaking artistry that set this movie apart as a true classic. Continue reading

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The Masque of the Red Death (1964)

18 Oct

 

Vincent Price is in just about every scene in this one and it is a glorious thing.

 

I flirted with the idea of a four-word review of “The Masque of the Red Death,” because I think that with only four words you could probably know if this film is something you’d enjoy. Those four words would be: Roger Corman. Vincent Price. Those of you who wish to can stop reading now, but if you want to click on, I will expound a bit. Continue reading

Venus in Furs (1969)

15 Oct

 

She's pretty for sure. But in film, as in life, sometimes pretty just ain't enough.

 

I kept waiting for the horror in “Venus in Furs.” It’s listed as a “horror classic” on Netflix, and the premise seems supernatural if less than spooky. Little by little, I became quite aware of the true terror of this film: With every monotone voice-over, I shuddered. With every hamfisted musical exclamation, I cringed. With every wooden expression, I gnashed my teeth. Yes, the true terror of “Venus in Furs” is in how mind-meltingly bad it is. Continue reading

Peeping Tom (1960)

9 Oct

 

This character's relationship with his camera is not a healthy one.

 

There was a moment while watching “Peeping Tom” where I physically shuddered. And I have the benefit of being a modern viewer and knowing there are certain places a film from 1960 just will not go. I can’t imagine what audiences of the time must have thought of this shockingly effective psychological thriller. Continue reading