Archive | Comedy RSS feed for this section

Fido (2006)

21 Oct

One good thing about a zombie dance partner: He won't mind if you step on his foot.

So … zombies are kind of everywhere these days, and — although I don’t agree with it — I guess I can sort of understand when people say they’re sort of over them. I mean, there’s only so much you can do with dumb, lumbering dead people that are intensely brain-driven and prove easy to kill once you know how. Smart filmmakers are coming up with new ways to make zombie movies without actually making movies about zombies. With its blend of black humor, ’50s shtick, sharp satire and, yes, plenty of gore, “Fido” is right on trend. Continue reading

Advertisements

TiMER (2009)

8 Sep

So if he doesn't make my TiMER go off, but he's really cute, is it wrong to make out with him?

From the concept of a single soulmate for every person to questioning the purpose of relationships that don’t last, “TiMER” is a little movie that takes on big questions and almost succeeds in answering them. Continue reading

The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard (2009)

4 Sep

In this corner, trying hard to win your affection yet failing miserably: Our Heroes.

Remember not so long ago during the “Kick-Ass” discussion when I cautioned against using a descriptive word in your title if you couldn’t guarantee said word? You guessed it, “The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard” doesn’t deliver, um, the goods. Not by a long shot. Continue reading

(500) Days of Summer (2009)

1 Sep

People this attractive shouldn't be allowed to be together. It ruins the gene pool for the rest of us.

My inner cynic thought I would hate “(500) Days of Summer.” I don’t like many romantic movies, much less romantic comedies. I get tired of the drooling fanboy worship of Zooey Deschanel (who is a fine actress, but come on!). The movie seemed overly hipster-y and slightly twee. My inner cynic was, however, wrong. Continue reading

Harold and Maude (1971)

29 Aug

For a long time, I avoided “Harold and Maude.” It’s habitually described as a “cult comedy,” occasionally as the “ultimate” cult comedy, and my experience with cult comedies has been very hot and cold. And so, despite the critical acclaim and the recommendations from people I know who love it, I avoided it — mostly from fear that it wouldn’t live up to its reputation. Now I know the truth: To dismiss “Harold and Maude” as a mere cult film by labeling it as such does a disservice to what is surely one of the more subversive and yet most hopeful and genuine films of its era. Continue reading