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Eraserhead (1976)

28 Oct

I was wholly unprepared for the sheer beauty of "Eraserhead." Even at its most horrific, it's jaw-dropping.

In which I attempt to describe my experience of seeing “Eraserhead” for the first time with the full knowledge that very few people will agree with my opinions and might, in fact, believe me crazy after seeing this film for themselves unless they have already seen it, in which case they will either understand what I mean or will definitely think I’m crazy. Continue reading

The Innocents (1961)

20 Oct

 

One of the creepiest scenes in this film has relatively little to do with the plot. It's just another in a long string of relentlessly odd shots that serve to completely unnerve the viewer.

Both visually stunning and relentlessly creepy, “The Innocents” proves a film needn’t be gory to be scary. This is a movie of which one can honestly say, “They don’t make ’em like that anymore,” and know it’s too bad they don’t. Modern horror movies could not help but benefit from the type of intensely focused plot and filmmaking artistry that set this movie apart as a true classic. Continue reading

The Searchers (1956)

7 Oct

This one scene encapsulates the entire movie in such a bold way that it's breathtaking.

How often does the final scene in a movie really have impact anymore? Sure you’ll get some powerful endings from time to time, but more often than not modern films feel like they settle for winding down rather than going for it and making a true statement with an iconic, meaningful image. “The Searchers” goes for broke in its final scene and succeeds so well it’s breathtaking. Continue reading

The Social Network (2010)

5 Oct

 

For once, I can't think of anything snarky to say. Jesse Eisenberg is just brilliant.

The irony of checking into Foursquare and posting simultaneously to Facebook and Twitter from the theatre where I was seeing “The Social Network” — otherwise known as “That Facebook Movie” — was not lost on me. It felt terribly meta, and yet it would seem strange to not comment on what film I was seeing this week. While “The Social Network” is a film about the creation of Facebook, it is also a film about why that sense of connectedness it provides is so very important, and that’s what makes this film brilliant. Continue reading

Harold and Maude (1971)

29 Aug

For a long time, I avoided “Harold and Maude.” It’s habitually described as a “cult comedy,” occasionally as the “ultimate” cult comedy, and my experience with cult comedies has been very hot and cold. And so, despite the critical acclaim and the recommendations from people I know who love it, I avoided it — mostly from fear that it wouldn’t live up to its reputation. Now I know the truth: To dismiss “Harold and Maude” as a mere cult film by labeling it as such does a disservice to what is surely one of the more subversive and yet most hopeful and genuine films of its era. Continue reading